Long-lost "tasty genes" could soon be spliced back into store-bought tomatoes

Researchers have completed a pan-genome of all cultivated tomato breeds, uncovering thousands of unknown genes that ...

It's no secret that tomatoes plucked from the supermarket aisles just aren't as tasty as those sitting in a roadside stall, fresh off the farm. That difference is due to tomato growers selecting for genes that help the fruit survive the long journey, sacrificing taste in the process. To find taste genes that could be spliced back into commercial crops, researchers have now complied a pan-genome of all cultivated and related wild tomato species, uncovering almost 5,000 previously-unknown genes.

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Gene-modified viruses rescue patient from drug-resistant ‘superbug’

Doctors normally resort to bacteriophages (bacteria-killing viruses) to kill antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" only when they've run out of options, in part because it's difficult to find the ideal example. It can take months or more just to find a v...

Anti-CRISPR molecules discovered that can block the gene editing technology

Newly discovered anti-CRISPR molecules can quickly inhibit the activity of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing process

As we dive into the brave new world of gene editing, CRISPR technologies are undoubtedly becoming increasingly precise, but alongside enhanced precision is also the necessity for developing ways to inhibit or block the process – an anti-CRISPR molecule, if you will. New work from the Broad Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital has presented a study that homes in on small molecules that may have the ability to safely block the CRISPR gene editing process.

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Scientists seek genetic answer to predatory nature of invasive lionfish

Genetics help to identify the origins of the lionfish that are devastating warm American waters

The lionfish is an invasive species that is currently wreaking havoc in the warm waters of the Bahamas, the Caribbean, and the US southwestern Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts. But where did they come from and what makes this normally docile hunter suddenly turn vicious in its new home? To answer these questions, North Carolina State University initiated a study of lionfish genetics to learn more about their origins and how to control them.

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Anti-obesity genetic variant discovery paves way for new weight-loss drugs

Examining genetic data from half a million people revealed several specific genetic variants associated with lower ...

An impressive large-scale genetic study, led by scientists at the University of Cambridge, has homed in on a number of specific variants in a single gene that can help people either lose or gain weight. The research revealed that some naturally-occurring variants in the MC4R gene can offer protection against obesity, and the hope is that this discovery will lead to new weight-loss drugs that mimic this genetic variation.

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CRISPR breakthrough uses "hairpin lock" for more precise genetic engineering

The new hairpin lock – blue section at the top left – folds back on itself ...

The CRISPR gene-editing system is incredibly accurate, but when there are billions of base pairs of DNA to scroll through, it's not unusual for it to be a little bit off target sometimes. Now, biomedical engineers at Duke University have created an RNA "lock" that can apparently make the system far more precise, and it works with all kinds of CRISPR variations.

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Category: Biology

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