Inside the head of a killer: Imaging study uncovers unique brain abnormalities in murderers

A new study involving MRI scans of hundreds of brains of convicted prisoners suggests notable differences ...

For decades scientists have been exploring the minds of criminals, trying to understand what makes a person commit a violent, heinous act. A new study is taking the idea of neuro-imaging criminal behavior one step further than any prior research, suggesting the brains of individuals that have committed murder are notably different from other criminals, both violent and non-violent.

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Category: Biology

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Scientists complete first map of an animal's nervous system in "major milestone"

Scientists have mapped the entire nervous system of a roundworm called C. elegans

The brain is by far our most complex organ, with its billions upon billions of neurons that talk to each other through a vast network of synaptic connections. But there are simpler ways we can improve our understanding of it than mapping this impossibly intricate web. Enter a millimeter-long roundworm known as Caenorhabditis elegans, which scientists have been using as a model to study the human brain for some time, but have now compiled what they call the first complete map of its entire nervous system.

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Category: Biology

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How neuroscience could provide the answer to beating boredom

A subject undergoing a boredom induction task while having their brainwaves monitored

Boredom is as universal a human state as happiness or sadness, but the degree to which it is triggered in different individuals is incredibly subjective. A fascinating new study from researchers at Washington State University, looking at brainwave activity in bored subjects, has found boredom is heightened by a lack of left frontal brain activity.

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Renegade immune cells found to raid aging brains and choke new neuron generation

Researchers hypothesize a newly discovered mechanism may be responsible for general age-related memory problems

New work led by Stanford University scientists has revealed killer immune cells have been found to collect in parts of the brain where new nerve cells are generated. This damaging proliferation seems to naturally increase as a brain ages and the researchers hypothesize this may be a mechanism that underpins general age-related cognitive decline.

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Category: Medical

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Discovery of new autoimmune disease triggered by testicular cancer

New research has solved a 20-year-old mystery explaining why some men with testicular cancer also suffer ...

Scientists have discovered a new autoimmune disease that is specifically triggered by testicular cancer. Utilizing a newly developed diagnostic tool, the research revealed how the cancer can cause the immune system to target the brain, bringing on severe neurodegenerative disease.

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Category: Medical

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Exercising before study may enhance learning and stimulate new neural connections

A new study involving mice has found a short bout of exercise enhanced the expression of ...

It is certainly no newsflash to suggest exercise is beneficial for brain health, but exactly how physical activity confers cognitive enhancements is still not entirely clear. Compelling new research from Oregon Health & Science University has discovered a single session of exercise can enhance the expression of a gene that promotes synaptic growth in the hippocampus.

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Category: Health & Wellbeing

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New insights into how a mammalian brain naturally produces psychedelic DMT

New research brings us closer to understanding how psychedelic DMT is endogenously produced in a brain, ...

A compelling new study has revealed how a mammalian brain can produce an incredibly powerful hallucinogen called DMT. The research shows the psychedelic is endogenously produced in a number of brain regions, including the visual cortex, and spikes in concentrations following an induced cardiac arrest.

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Brain study reveals type of schizophrenia similar to neurodegenerative disease

A new study is a step towards identifying different subtypes of schizophrenia characterized by distinct pathological ...

Research from Johns Hopkins Medicine has revealed some cases of schizophrenia can be associated with abnormal protein buildup in the brain similar to that seen in cases of Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative disorders. It's hoped the discovery will lead to better diagnostic strategies identifying specific types of schizophrenia.

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Category: Medical

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